Bamboo Shoots & Jute Leaves in Coconut Milk (Ginataang Labong at Saluyot)

Today we made a quick trip to the Farmer’s Market.  I heard they were selling Asian vegetables.  That got me interested. When we got there, I spotted the Chinese vendors and that’s where I headed. The first thing that caught my eye were the Jute leaves so I grabbed a bunch.

I read article a while back that Jute leaves or what we call “Saluyot” where I grew up, is very good for your digestion.  Some people eat a lot of these to promote weight loss.  It is high in anti-oxidants and eating a lot of it reduces wrinkles and fine line in the body.  I guess I need to plant some of these and be on a continuous Jute leaves diet, hahaha.

Here is a recipe a grew up with.  Most of the ingredients could be found in the Asian section of most supermarkets.  You can substitute Jute leaves with Okra if you want that silky taste or Spinach.

Ingredients

2 tbsp vegetable oil (divided)

1/2 pound pork, sliced

1/2 pound shrimp, deveined

1 medium onion, sliced

3 cloves garlic, minced

1 cup bamboo shoots

1 cup water chestnuts

1 cup young corn

6 cups vegetable broth (substitute – water)

1 ear of corn, kernels sliced (reserve the cob)

salt and pepper to taste

1 bunch Jute leaves (substitute – spinach and/or okra)

1 1/2 cups coconut cream

Directions

Heat 1 tbsp vegetable oil in a medium-sized pan. Add pork slices.  Cook for 5 minutes.  Add shrimp and cook for another 3 minutes.  Turn off heat and set aside.

In a large pot, heat remainder of the vegetable oil.  Saute onions until it is translucent. Add garlic and cook until slightly brown.

Add bamboo shoots, water chestnuts, young corn. Stir fry for 5 minutes.

Add vegetable broth and corn cob and bring to a boil. Add corn kernels and cook for 10 minutes.

Add jute leaves and cook leaves until slightly wilted.  Season with salt and pepper.

Add the cooked pork and shrimps

Remove the corn cob and pour in the cream of coconut.

Let it simmer for 5 minutes and turn off the heat.

Tips

When sauteing the garlic, don’t let it burn.  Burnt garlic tastes bitter.

If you are using fresh bamboo shoots, put it in the pot first and let it cook for 5 minutes before putting in the rest of the vegetables.

You can substitute salt with fish sauce but not soy sauce.  Soy sauce changes the color of the soup.

Putting the cob of the corn adds flavor to the broth.

Put the coconut cream last and do not let it boil too much as it will curdle the coconut milk and leave lumps in the soup.

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7 thoughts on “Bamboo Shoots & Jute Leaves in Coconut Milk (Ginataang Labong at Saluyot)

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    1. Hi,

      You can also boil or steam jute leaves and okra and just drizzle it with red wine vinegar or balsamic vinegar. I love this as a side for grilled fish.

      I try to do some research on my ingredients and posts some tips too.

      Thanks!

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